Lines Are Open

Give me a comment if you’re still reading this much-neglected blog. I recently had to decide whether to keep the site or let it expire, and as you can see I chose the former.

The coming months are busy, but never so much that I can’t post something to social media. In the past, that’s meant Facebook and Twitter (and to a much lesser extent other sites), but I’d like to justify the cost of this site by making it more often my primary outlet. What would you like to see here?

My main thing here has been Creative Colleagues, which I’d like to continue later in the summer when I have more bandwidth. But I’d also like to know what, if anything, you’d like to see in addition to that feature.

Creative Colleagues: Bob Murch

Every now and then, I pester my creative colleagues with five questions about their work. Most of these folks are friends, a few are secret enemies, and one has been blackmailing me for years.

While I’ve worked with many artists, I haven’t met many of my sculpting heroes. Despite his living only one province to the left, I haven’t even encountered Bob Murch at a convention yet. He sits upon a high throne in my personal pantheon of miniature-figure sculptors. I love his style, his taste, and his unabashed love of pulp fiction tropes—especially his occasional translation of a famous screen character onto the personae of his 28mm figures.

Whether they’re for Call of Cthulhu, Gangbusters, Justice Inc., Torg, Savage Worlds, or Bob’s own Rugged Heroes or Black Sun rules, his two-fisted miniatures capture the magic of the bygone years of Republic serials and films like… well, you can see his recommendations below.

Bob sells his miniatures directly from his own Pulp Figures site and through Crucible Crush. Peruse those galleries and enjoy the cosmic horror of deciding which ones to add to your game first.

Bob Murch contemplates his next sculpture.

Which are some of your favorite pulp era heroes and heroines from print or screen? What makes them so iconic even in these days?

Tarzan was my first big Pulp Hero. I discovered several of the old Ballantine paperbacks in the school library around grade seven. After the first book there was no turning back for me. My family went camping lots so I took to not wearing shoes in the summer so my feet would toughen up. I seldom wore a shirt so I could lay down a Tarzan tan. I strung a rope up in the big tree in our backyard and I took to climbing it constantly. My dad remembered walking across the yard, hearing me say hello, looking up and seeing me, once more, in the top of the tree.

Then came Conan.

Why were these characters so Iconic? I’m sure Freud, or more likely Jung, would have a better answer than I do. I think these characters are representative of how we would like to imagine ourselves. Beyond escapism, they embody all manner of strong characteristics, both physically and mentally: honor, fearlessness, a sense of purpose. Classic heroes give us an ideal to strive toward.

Among the many things I love about your miniatures is that you mimic screen characters with such personality. Which famous actors haven’t you yet replicated but would love to? (And which are your favorites that you’ve already cast in lead?)

Commandant von Helsing from the Cthulhu 1968: Black Sun line.

I need to do some of the early comedians. Chaplin, Stan and Ollie, Buster Keaton, the Marx Brothers, W.C. Fields. I can’t predict when, but I’ve been thinking about them for some time now. I love the old silent comedies as well as the early talkies.

My current favorite is my Peter Cushing inspired sculpt. There is a version of him as an evil Nazi colonel in the Black Sun range, and I just released him in his Victor Frankenstein guise.

Another great thing about the miniatures you produce is that you include the women, and with Dangerous Dames you’re moving much closer to parity with heroes and heroines. Who are the heroines of the silver screen and history that most inspire you as a pulp fiction fan?

Sylvia Trent and Mrs. Mallowan from the latest Dangerous Dames set.

Women are gaming more and more, and I think we owe it to them to start being more inclusive with our characters. The pulp era gave as several notable female characters, both real—Amelia Earhart, Aloha Wanderwell, Nellie Bly, Gertrude Belle—and imaginary—Catherine Hepburn in The African Queen, Pat Savage, Jirel of Joiry, plucky reporter Torchy Blane, and any early Noir character played by Lauren Bacall.

Your China Station scenarios suggest a love of the history of the clash between Western and Eastern cultures. What can gamers learn about the real-world histories of those conflicts through roleplaying and other tabletop games?

Conflict is the essence of drama, so it’s natural that some of the most dramatic periods in which to set a game would be in the colonial era. I think, however, that there is a big difference between the pop culture version of these settings and the real periods. The Pulp Era tends to be very western-centric. It’s romantic for many of us who grew up with this entertainment. A minimal amount of historical research, however, can lead one to some very different realities, and one shouldn’t confuse reality and fantasy.

You do great work with both miniatures and terrain. What does the physical medium add to the gaming experience?

It provides a focal point for the imagination, a gateway into the experience. Aside from the fun of building and painting, which can be totally satisfying in and of itself, models then give us a physical reality of a sort. Its not that different from some sort of religious icon. Think of an Egyptian statue in a temple. It gave the visitors a common focus when the priest was relating a story of the gods and heroes. Again, a gateway into the world of the imagination.

Any resemblance to a certain Mr. Greenstreet is surely coincidental.

What are some of the essential films of the pulp era?

The Maltese Falcon
Lost Horizon
Island of Lost Souls
Casablanca
To Have and Have Not
Tarzan and the Amazons
The Wolfman
The Lady from Shanghai
The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
This Gun for Hire

How about some book recommendations?

The Mister Moto series
The Tarzan series
The Shadow series
Any Doc Savage book
The Big Sleep
Lost Horizon
The Thin Man

Any Fu Manchu book
She
Any Robert E. Howard modern adventure

Many of your best figures straddle the line between pulp and superhero characters. Where do you draw the line between adventure and fantasy?

I’m really not a fan of costumed superheroes. Sorry, heresy, I know, but they never did it for me. Are they science fiction? Fantasy? I can’t put my finger on it, but I prefer a hero in a pith helmet with a compass.

Your earliest fame in miniatures sculpting game from your Call of Cthulhu figures. What, in miniatures terms, are your favorite elements of the Cthulhu Mythos?

The Cthulhu Mythos is about cosmic awe. The universe is very big and very scary if you really start thinking about it. The Mythos generates for me a feeling that contains elements of both supernatural and scientific wonder and horror. A good Mythos fig, again, acts as a portal into a place of intense imagination.

Favorite elements? Why tentacles, of course.

Creative Colleagues: Oliver McNeil

Every now and then, I pester my creative colleagues with five questions about their work. Most of these folks are friends, a few are secret enemies, and one has been blackmailing me for years.

Oliver McNeil by Oliver McNeil.

I first came across Oliver McNeil’s Soundscapes page while searching for ambient music to play during Call of Cthulhu scenarios. While I already had loads of tracks prepared from other sources, including some tailored specifically to the Masks of Nyarlathotep campaign I’ve been running this past year, I knew one day I’d come back to add his work to my collection.

That time came quite recently when I noticed his Kickstarter campaign offering a “best-of” collection from his first five volumes. There’s also a fantastic bargain on the whole collection as one of the higher pledges, so that sold me.

What I didn’t realize until recently is that Olly is also a game designer and theater writer, producer, and actor. What I’ve read of his chilling productions made me once more lament that I live on the wrong side of the pond. Intrigued to learn more, I dropped him a note asking about the connection between his gaming, musical, and theatrical creative lives.

What elements of both live theatre and music are perfect for conveying mystery and horror? That is, in what ways are they even better mediums than film, comics, or novels?

I think that if you go to a really good live theater show, you tap into that base instinct that we all have when we get drawn into a good book or movie. It’s the immersion that makes us forget about the outside world and fall into the story being told. For live theater however, you are using more of your senses, your hearing and sense of smell is certainly going to pick up all everything around you. There is also, especially in my shows, the very real prospect of having to get involved physically. Physiologically and psychologically there is quite a lot you can do to control an audience in a show. Music is just one of my tools.

What elements of the Cthulhu Mythos most tickle your imagination? In what ways does cosmic horror appeal above other forms?

It’s the unknown that particularly appeals to me, that and the fragile nature of the investigators. I’ve always enjoyed the everyday person being thrown into an adventure with little more than their wits, bravery, and inquisitiveness. I love the wide-eyed innocence that we still have when looking into the deep, whether that is space, water, or our own minds. It’s still as relevant today as it was when Lovecraft was writing.

What different emotions do you try to express with your soundscapes? That is, what do you find to be the most effective transitions between different emotional states (like curiosity, suspense, dread, and so on)?

Most of the music I produce is designed to create a mood that will help the actor or storyteller (GM) work the audience/players. It’s a background to play against, almost meditative. In fact it’s something I use in my live shows all the time. It allows you the GM to punctuate or shock the players whenever you like. All the titles of the soundscapes, which are all twenty-five minutes long, have names that make it easy to guess the mood, even before playing.

The biggest trick I use in my live shows is getting the audience into a state where they forget about their normal lives and move into a state of being in the story. Last year I adapted Steve Jackson’s Fighting Fantasy book House of Hell into a live show. This was the track I used along with one of my actors to get the audience immersed. I have a version for roleplayers on my website called Deep Dream.

In addition to soundscapes, what other atmosphere drivers do you use at the game table?

I use all the tools of theater in my games: lighting, set dressing, props, and costume. Of all of those, beside the soundscape, the most important is lighting. It’s also by far the easiest to create. Telling a ghost story during the day in a busy bar is different from telling the same tale in room lit by a single candle.

A couple of years ago, I wrote a show called “Séance.” The only sound we had was a real clock ticking, the only lighting one real wax candle. The clock would chime every half hour, which would give a creepy shock to people, and with one candle I had control to where I wanted to focus. You will also find that people will start seeing all kinds of things in the darkness that are projected from their own imaginations.

While theatre is a local art, film goes everywhere. What films would you recommend to Keepers or GMs as inspirations for great roleplaying scenarios?

There are two things that I would recommend, and one is only partially films. I would highly recommend looking at the early days of photography and silent movies. Haxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages, The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Seven Footprints to Satan, and of course Nosferatu. I’m not saying just look at the plots, but look at the atmosphere, lighting, and reveals. As well as being around when Lovecraft was writing, they were created by masters of their craft. They knew horror, poverty, and death first-hand.

The photographer I would always point at for those to seek out is William Mortensen. Shunned by most of Hollywood at the time, he was daring in creating a grotesque world.

The other recommendation for great scenarios would be to look at real-life history. There are so many strange places and people, more than likely some of which live or have lived near to where you are sitting now. Personally, I grew up near a place called Brightling where lived a man called Mad Jack Fuller. He owned his own observatory, built strange buildings such as an Egyptian needle temple, and was buried sitting in his favorite armchair, in a pyramid, in a churchyard, with broken glass around him so the devil couldn’t take his soul. I’m sure you could all fill in your own terrible Cthulhu-esque connections to make this a great campaign.

Oliver’s Cthulhu Soundscapes: Sounds of Madness “Compilation” is now live on Kickstarter. Give it a listen!

Creative Colleagues: Steve Portillano-Barr

Every now and then, I pester my creative colleagues with five questions about their work. Most of these folks are friends, a few are secret enemies, and one has been blackmailing me for years.

Steve Portillano-Barr first hove into my view when he joined my Keeper’s Support Group for Masks of Nyarlathotep, one of the greatest roleplaying adventures ever published. The news that he was creating Syrinscape SoundSets for the great campaign thrilled those of us currently enticing groups of hapless investigators along the global path to madness and destruction.

Steve has designed SoundSets for the Peru, America, England, and Egypt chapters of the campaign, and they’re fantastic additions to an experience that already includes an embarrassing trove of high-quality supplements, like the H.P. Lovecraft Historical Society’s Gamer Prop Box and Dark Adventure Theatre radio drama. When you put them all together, you can run an astonishingly immersive roleplaying experience.

Steve recently answered a few questions about his work and influences.


Are you more often thinking “jump scare” or “rising tension” when designing soundscapes? What’s the right balance?
Syrinscape lends itself well to both, with the Keeper easily able to switch between moods as the story necessitates. Many of the Call of Cthulhu stories focus strongly on the rising tension as the situation spirals ever closer to either madness or doom for the investigators. But it is important to also have those jump scare moments, where the Keeper can touch a button and all hell breaks loose. With Syrinscape, the sounds fade from one SoundSet into another, so when you have that jump scare it will make your heart leap. But, at the same time, the effect naturally flows from the previous sounds and not sound disjointed or like you have just stopped and started something.

Masks of Nyarlathotep is one of the most celebrated roleplaying campaigns of all time, and it’s based in historical times and events. How do you honor that history with your work?
I’m a huge fan of history and love reading about that particular time period, so working on the Call of Cthulhu soundsets and bringing the 20s to life has been amazing for me. With each of the chapters of Mask of Nyarlathotep, I’ve really tried to capture the spirit of the period and the locations. Each of the cities has been recreated using a mixture of foley work (by myself and the Syrinscape team), along with public domain recordings, audio shared as Creative Commons from various museums, and at times visits to some of the locations. Of course, period music really helps bring the scenes to life. The Old Bell Inn, which features when the Investigators head to Derby, is one of my local pubs, so I had to visit once or twice while drafting my outline for the chapter.

You can run Syrinscape from your computer, a tablet, or your phone.


Who are some of the sound designers or score composers whose work most influences you?
I am a huge fan of Hans Zimmerman and Lisa Gerrard. The soundtracks for Black Hawk Down and Gladiator are two of my favorites. Hans has such an amazing way of capturing the spirit of the moment with his music and he has such a distinctive sound that his work has always stood out for me. Lisa has an unforgettable voice and the ability to sings songs that make you feel as if you are listening to Arabic, Latin, or Croatian, yet she uses no true words to achieve that affect, just the tone of her voice.

For sound designers it would have to be Ben Burtt, who for me has worked on some of the most iconic films of my generation. He brought a more natural organic sound to foley work in a period when many of the sound effects for sci-fi films were electronic and computerized, one of the reasons why to me Star Wars: A New Hope still stands out as such an iconic movie.


Some of the most effective horror stories evoke not only visuals but scents, tastes, tactile feelings, and of course sounds. What are some of the stories whose non-visual imagery has stayed with you?
The use of the Goldberg Variations in the Hannibal franchise has always stood out to me. The mixture of the music, the imagery, and of course Hannibal’s unique character led to making Hannibal one of my favorite films despite its disturbing nature and violence. The opera scene accompanied by “Vide cor Meum” is one of the film’s most memorable scenes.

What’s some of your favorite music? How do you decide what influences get into your work and which ones you keep out?
I have an eclectic taste in music, ranging from classical right up to industrial rock. I’ve already mentioned Hans Zimmer and Lisa Gerrard, but there are also other great artists like Regina Spektor and Trent Reznor that I like to listen to. To me, music and sounds can evoke such an emotional reaction. Often, my taste at any one given time depends on my mood or how I want my mood to be. That comes in really useful when deciding what music to use in my SoundSets as it helps me hone in on how I want the investigators to feel. Should the music be center stage or in the background, just loud enough to intrude on their thoughts?


Can you recommend five great horror films to watch this October?
I’m actually pretty squeamish when it comes to most horror movies, so I haven’t seen a lot. But my top five would have to be 28 Days Later, Resident Evil, Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal, and of course In the Mouth of Madness. I tend to prefer suspense thrillers over gore-fests!

You can sample and buy the Masks of Nyarlathotep SoundScapes directly from Syrinscape, who also offer many other sets for fantasy, SF, and horror RPGs.

Creative Colleagues: Chuck McGrew

Chuck McGrew

Chuck McGrew

I’ve never met Chuck McGrew, and I didn’t even converse with him until recently. Still, I’ve felt as if I’ve known him for years all because I played one session of his game, Don’t Look Back.

While editing magazines at TSR, I lost interest in playing Dungeons & Dragons after hours, since I spent those long workdays living and breathing D&D. Fortunately, there were frequent opportunities to try other games, often when Lester Smith had a new game to playtest for review.

One of the many good things about Lester is that he actually plays a game before reviewing it, so he arranged an evening with four of us—David Wise, Ted Stark, Thomas Reid, and Yours Truly—and walked us through character creation verbally. As he listed skills and archetypes, we sketched out our characters. Despite the many options, we ended up with two bullies and two nerds, not exactly the classic fighter-wizard-rogue-cleric combo, but a great mix for exploring a haunted house.

While there were a lot of laughs and inter-party banter, there were some genuine scares, too. In the end, that session of Don’t Look Back turned out to be the most memorable of those one-night playtest sessions, and I was sorry when I though the game had gone forever out of print.

Yet like the zombie you thought defeated, it has risen again, this time through a Kickstarter campaign you still have time to join. Lester put me in touch with Chuck, and I asked him some of the usual horror/RPG nerd questions. Here’s how it went.

Some of the most popular horror roleplaying games, like Call of Cthulhu, The Whispering Vault, or the World of Darkness games, have very distinct identities. What’s Don’t Look Back‘s specific character?
I deliberately wrote Don’t Look Back to cover a broad spectrum of paranormal and supernatural horror themes. I pushed it more toward the paranormal side with corrupted technology—like a zombie virus or a flesh-eating amoeba or things from another world creeping into our own, as opposed to the supernatural—but the underlying conspiracies are probably the one thing that sets it apart from the others. I think the fact that your characters never know who they can trust—even each other—adds to the sense of horror.

You mention embracing a sense of paranoia. Can you list 10 books and/or films you think are great at capturing that feeling? While designing the game, were you conscious of any of them being an influence?

The original inspirations for Don’t Look Back were my fond memories of Kolchak: The Night Stalker mixed with a sense of paranoia from a movie called Race with the Devil, where two couples are traveling and stumble into a witchcraft ceremony in a rural area then later find out that it’s really everywhere. A few years later I read Orwell’s 1984, and the pieces started coming together.

During the creation of DLB and several of the first playtest sessions, players found their characters on the run from an establishment much more corrupt than anyone could have imagined. When I was a kid, my uncle used to take me to every slasher and horror movie that came out. Scanners still sticks with me today. It had secret government programs, conspiracies, and people with insane paranormal abilities. Firestarter from Stephen King added to those ideas about people on the run as well as the original Escape from Witch Mountain (don’t judge me).

Since writing the last edition of DLB, I can see inspiration forming from ideas sparked by The Matrix and Enemy of the State in terms of the technological challenges for people who want to stay off the grid. Day of the Triffids and the remake of Invasion of the Body Snatchers as well as John Carpenter’s The Thing are excellent at creating a sense of paranoia as the protagonist finds himself becoming part of a rapidly shrinking group who can be trusted. No discussion of paranoia could be complete without a shout out to Jacob’s Ladder and Shutter Island. Not knowing if you can even trust your own mind may be the darkest form of paranoia.

How have the mechanics for DLB changed? And how do you marry game rules to a horror setting?

It’s hard to maintain a sense of suspense in a game when your players have to flip through rulebooks, cross-reference tables, and make lots of dice rolls. Doing things like that basically pulls you out of the game, and that just isn’t what I wanted. I wanted mechanics that were easy to learn, intuitive, fast-paced, and as transparent as possible to help maintain the mood.

As much as I love the original DLB mechanics system, I am changing it in the new edition to something that I think works even better. The new DLB will be the first full-size RPG to utilize Lester Smith’s D6xD6 game mechanics. It uses regular six-sided dice like DLB and includes many of the same features as the original rules, like doing away with lots of complex scores and resolving actions with a single roll, but they are implemented in a way that makes gameplay even faster. You can learn the system in a matter of minutes.

The DLB version will include some tweaks to D6xD6, such as allowing characters to have advantages and disadvantages. I am also working on some new rules that will bring the effects of fear into the game. The nice thing about being part of a game ecosystem is that other D6xD6 settings may be able to take advantage of these tweaks, plus it will provide people who play DLB with access to other compatible settings and scenarios.

Tell us about a time you actually got scared during an RPG, or a time when you actually scared players.

To really scare players, I think you have to create a sense of immersion, a true sense of the unknown, and you need to make sure they understand that their characters are always vulnerable.

I like to use “feelies” like maps, old newspaper articles, and hand-written clues to give things a sense of reality. The adventures in the new edition of DLB include a lot of handout items. I also like to play in a quiet room and preferably at night. Passing notes to players and having PCs with different agendas helps to create an environment of distrust and paranoia. In Don’t Look Back, where you never know who you can trust and nothing is what it appears to be, that should extend to the PCs as well.

You don’t have to kill a lot of the PCs, but it really helps to have rules that make it possible for any one good shot to take them out. Many RPGs are about building up these super-powered invincible heroes of mythic proportions. That’s awesome if that’s your goal. It just doesn’t work for horror.

We were playing late one night, and after the game ended a player called me about 2:00 am to tell me he was certain he was being followed home. He said he changed his route multiple times to throw them off. He didn’t realize until he got home and was getting his game stuff out of the car that it was all just in his head.

What music and sound effects do you like to use to set the atmosphere for a horror RPG?

It’s hard to beat actual soundtracks from horror movies when it comes to setting the mood, and more recently the same goes for computer games. It’s hard to go wrong with either. Here’s my list of personal favorites:

John Carpenter’s original theme for Halloween is one of the scariest pieces of music out there. I’m a fan of his in part because he was a master of storytelling and did a great job with his own soundtracks but also because he’s from my home state and uses lots of town and street names from places I’ve been.

Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross have done an amazing Carpenter-endorsed new version of the Halloween theme, and it’s really good. They had Karen O do the vocals on a remake of Zeppelin’s Immigrant Song for The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo soundtrack that is pretty haunting.

Alex Otterlei has produced some creepy, mood-setting pieces of music over the years. I bought his Dark Themes From Beyond a couple decades ago at a gaming convention, and it still holds up. I tend to just play all the tracks. He has several more recent titles to sample on YouTube and has some done some cool video game soundtracks too.

Depending on the mood of the game, I really like the original Friday the 13th soundtrack. Everybody knows what that “che che che che” sound means. It provides a good undercurrent to something that’s more maniacal than diabolical.

I can’t leave this list in good faith without mentioning the soundtrack to The Exorcist. If you’re looking for dark mood setting. It’s a sure thing.

Check out the Don’t Look Back campaign on Kickstarter.

 

Don't Look Back

 

Creative Colleagues: Ryan Schifrin & Richard Lee Byers

Ryan Schifrin

Ryan Schifrin

Every now and then, I pester my creative colleagues with five questions about their work. Most of these folks are friends, a few are secret enemies, and one has been blackmailing me for years.

Earlier this year, a friend pointed me to the Basil & Moebius short film “No Rest for the Wicked.” I was amazed I hadn’t heard of it before, considering the star power involved and the delightful odd-couple heroes inspired by the same duos who’d influenced Radovan and the Count.

I was worried for a minute when I saw there was a monkey, but the damned thing could act! When I learned that the film’s creator was the son of legendary composer Lalo Schifrin, I understood where he’d got his talent—but it still didn’t explain how he’d persuaded Ray Park, Zachary Levi, Kane Hodder and the great Malcolm McDowell to star in this little film.

A little later I put two and two together and realized Ryan Schifrin was the director of Abominable and a story in Tales of Halloween. And soon after that, he told me about his Basil & Moebius stories, novels, and comics—whose co-writers were all familiar names. Among them was Richard Lee Byers, who I’ll henceforth think of as the Basil to my Moebius in Forgotten Realms, Pathfinder, and upcoming still-secret fiction lines. His most recent Basil & Moebius adventure is The Picture of Aleister Crowley, and his next is the graphic novel The Fate of All Fools.

Richard is one of the tie-in writers whose prolific output puts the rest of us to shame, so we’ve got a couple of Creative Colleagues interviews lined up for this fall. For this first one, we invited Ryan to join in as we discuss all things Basil & Moebius.

Ryan, what’s the origin of Basil & Moebius?

Ryan Schifrin: I was at a live professional tennis tournament watching a doubles match. A Frenchman and German were on the same team, and I noticed their camaraderie and imagined them in Europe at a pub, drunk and looking for all sorts of mischief to get into. I thought, what if they were thieves instead of tennis players—basically the characters imposed themselves on me out of the blue, and I had no idea what story I’d put them in, but they felt absolutely real to me. I later thought, okay one will be proficient at martial arts, a Queen’s Guard by day who looks like he’s got a boring job, but his nightlife is full of these wild adventures. My dog’s name is Mister Fox, and I remember reading about a Sherlock Holmes-type mouse named Basil of Baker Street when I was a kid.

Moebius isn’t named after the comic book artist but rather the Möbius strip, which my father tried explaining to me when I was very young. That name stuck in my imagination. Then Origin games, the people behind the Ultima games, made a game named Moebius which I bought because I liked the name.

Author Richard Lee Byers

Author Richard Lee Byers

Richard, you’re an old hand at tie-in fiction. What was it about these characters that made writing them appeal to you?

Richard Lee Byers: I’ve always loved rogues and anti-heroes, the kind of adventurers who are out for themselves rather than to serve some lofty ideal, but who are not without compassion and end up grudgingly doing the right thing when it really matters. If they’re witty as they go about their business, so much the better. Like Fritz Leiber’s Gray Mouser and Fafhrd (my favorite fictional characters ever), Basil and Moebius are very much in this mold.

I also like the world in which Basil and Moebius operate. The source material for the series is our modern mythology, the realm of fringe science, urban legend, and conspiracy theory. There’s a lot of fun stuff to play with.

Finally, the tone or range of tones in the series make it fun. I can blend action, horror, crime, espionage, fantasy, science fiction, and comedy. In the universe Ryan has created, it all works together.

Ryan, you’ve also written and directed a film featuring Basil & Moebius. Please tell us a bit about the experience of casting and shooting it.

Ryan Schifrin: My goal from the start has been to do a live-action film or television series with Basil & Moebius. When I was writing the very first story, Bloodstone, it was as a screenplay. I was randomly seated next to Ray Park at the Saturn Awards. I realized he’d be the perfect Basil. He’s a world-class martial artist, he’s got a wicked sense of humor, and he was Darth Maul! So I literally wrote the script with him in mind, and he later read it and said he’d love to play Basil.

I almost got the funding to do the feature a few times, but things would always fall apart and we could never get it off the ground. At this point, the comics were coming out, so I figured it would be fun to do a short film which could also be a proof of concept. Ray was still keen to play Basil, and I needed a Moebius. I had become friends with Zach Levi, from NBC’s Chuck through a mutual friend. Zach can do any accent, and he’s hilarious and can be debonair as well. I asked him, and he said yes.

For the villain, we needed an actor with gravitas and I’ve always wanted to work with Malcolm McDowell. He’d worked with my father in the 70s on Voyage of the Damned, so I was able to get in touch with him. Kane Hodder, who played the best Jason ever in Friday the 13th Part 7, plays one of the Ghoul Brothers.

Since I was self-funding this, we didn’t have a lot of time or money, we used my wife’s dad’s house as the location (it was supposed to be a penthouse in London), and we shot it in a few days. It was fun and it was stressful, because we had animals (a monkey), stunts, visual FX, make-up FX. All the stuff they tell you to avoid using on a short schedule.

The monkey, Crystal, was amazing by the way— she’d get everything on the first take. I think Malcolm McDowell had a bad experience once working with a monkey, so he was looking very dubious until they did their first shot together and Crystal jumps out of her cage, stands up in a karate pose and holds up a blade. Malcolm’s jaw dropped and he exclaimed, “My God! Who needs actors?!”

Cover by Ken Kelley

Cover by Ken Kelley

Richard, which of the duo is your favorite? Or, if neither, what makes them such a good odd couple?

Richard Lee Byers: I’m extremely fond of both of them, but if I had to pick one, I guess it would be Basil. I like the way his down-to-earth practicality and perspective play off the marvels he encounters. They also play off well against Moebius’s narcissism and supreme (and sometimes unwarranted) self-confidence.


Tell us a bit about your initial collaborating process and what, if anything, has changed about it over time. In what ways do you two complement each other?

Ryan Schifrin: Richard is one of those pros who has worked in shared universes, from Forgotten Realms, to Pathfinder, and so on, so he’s used to collaborating and playing in different sandboxes. My job was just to make sure he knew the voice of the characters, so his stories and my stories and Tim’s stories would all feel like the same characters are in them. I’m a big believer in giving as much creative freedom as possible, so I basically told him that he can write any story he wants. I gave him a list of some of the MacGuffin’s we’d used in other stories, and locations, so we wouldn’t be redundant, but otherwise he could do anything he wants—except kill off Basil and Moebius!

He’d send me an outline, I’d give any notes or suggestions, and he’d go off and write. I don’t think I ever hardly had any notes. On The Gold Bugs Affair, the main note I had was that I wanted the Collector to end up keeping two of the cyborg pilots because I thought they were so cool we should use them in future adventures—which we did in the Fate of All Fools graphic novel.

Since our collaboration is long distance, not a lot has changed, I think as long as I’m clear up front what the goals are, Richard then can find better and unique solutions than I can ever think of. The main thing is, I trust Basil and Moebius being in Richard’s hands. He knows the characters. Especially I think he’s got Moebius’s use of language and humor spot on. I try to focus on structure and action set-pieces—the frame of the house, and I can trust Richard to come in and furnish and decorate it with his impeccable taste.

Richard, now that you’ve written both prose and comic versions of these characters, how do you compare the experience of working in either medium?

Richard Lee Byers: When Ryan brought me onboard with Basil and Moebius, I was pretty much already an old hand at fantasy adventure told in prose, and I simply approached the novelettes in my usual way. Scripting a graphic novel, though, was a new experience for me, and as I set about it, I quickly became aware of just how few words the writer has available. I had to focus on what absolutely needed to be said, say it succinctly, and cut everything else. That was true for establishing character and all the other aspects of the tale. I also had to trust the artist to convey a lot through facial expression, body language, etc. Happily, that trust was not misplaced. The artist Ryan recruited is great. I am immodest enough to say I thought the script was a good piece of writing, but the art enhances it in spectacular fashion.

Ryan, you’re collaborating with a number of people on these stories. What are some of the surprising strengths of your collaborators?

Ryan Schifrin: Let me just say how incredibly lucky I’ve been to collaborate with these incredibly gifted people, whose work I’ve been a fan of—as in I’m a big fanboy myself. I remember reading Larry Hama’s GI Joe comics when I was eight years old, and reading Tim Zahn’s Thrawn Trilogy when Star Wars was a dormant franchise. It was inspired work. And Richard, of course, I think Dissolution was the first book of his I read, and it was a twisted take on Fafhrd and the Mouser (which by the way, are also huge inspirations for Basil & Moebius). Larry is a master of condensing action and exposition, Tim is brilliant with detail and plotting, and Richard’s dark sense of humor always cracks me up.

Larry doesn’t really outline anything, especially in comics, he makes it up as he goes along, so I think he’s surprising himself and the reader at the same time. He literally doesn’t know how it’s going to end until he gets there, and I admire how he seemingly paints himself into a corner, and always finds a solution you’d never think of. With the prose short stories we’ve done, I’ve seen outlines from all the authors ahead of time, so there were no plot twists I was unaware of. Tim’s always done a job good writing about military adventure, especially his Hand of Judgement stormtroopers. So I did urge him to write Basil-centric stories, which would focus on his early career in the S.A.S. and loop in his old military buddies and things like that. Richard would then focus on more of the Moebius-centric stories, and his moral grey areas and twisted sense of humor. The other authors all did great work, but Tim and Richard wrote multiple stories, so I’m mentioning those specifically.

Richard Lee Byers: At the start, Ryan asked me to do stories analogous to the standard episodes of a modern TV drama. Basil and Moebius have an adventure that essentially leaves them where we found them. It is (if I did my job well) a whole lot of fun, but if it wasn’t part of the series, all the other stories would still be just the same.

After I’d written a couple stories and (I trust) not screwed anything up too badly, Ryan and I started talking about how the series as a whole could evolve, and in due course he invited me to work with him on a story analogous to the “mythology” episode of a TV show, a tale that addresses the characters’ basic situation and has the potential to change the status quo. The Fate of All Fools is that story. Basil and Moebius fans, this is what it’s all been building up to. It’s not the end of the saga (thank God), but it is the finale to the first grand movement of it.

What are the creative advantages of prose, comics, and film respectively? Have you encountered a story you felt could be told better by one of those media? Or do Basil & Moebius stories naturally lend themselves to visual more than prose storytelling?

Ryan Schifrin: This is a great question. First and foremost, to me the characters are the important thing, not the medium. In prose and comics, you don’t have to worry about the budget. You can be as epic as you want, can blow up all the stuff you want. Prose allows you to get into the thoughts and motivations of a character the most easily.

Comics are fantastic because they’re visual, and you can really show what you see in your head and anyone can instantly “get it.” Film allows you to have actors, who always bring something unexpected, and music, which can really add so much emotion. I never have a story and then try and figure out which medium would best fit it. I do the opposite—I first look at the medium and then decide, given the parameters, what story would best work within them.

In film, the main parameter is always money. How much can we afford to spend on actors, on sets, on renting equipment, payroll for crew, catering? The short film had to take place in one location, because of this. So that sets a creative challenge, to craft a story that works best in that setting. If you like the characters, I’d like to believe that the medium doesn’t matter, you want to go with them on whatever journey they are on.

Keep an eye on Magnetic Press for Basil & Moebius news.