Creative Colleagues: Mike Myler

Mike Myler

Mike Myler

Every now and then, I pester my creative colleagues with five questions about their work. Most of these folks are friends, a few are secret enemies, and one has been blackmailing me for years.

Mike Myler and I have a few friends in common, but I had no idea how much our tastes overlap until we chatted about Mists of Akuma. Film noir? Check. Asian fantasy? Check. Steampunk? Well, we both like that a little, so let’s call that 3/3.

Yours is not the first Eastern Fantasy/Steampunk mashup I’ve noticed. Why do those genres go together so well?

I think that there’s a mystique inherent to both—a sense of the unknown and unexpected that pairs nicely. Also there’s a sort of ramshackle quality both genres can have which resonates when the two interact. The order of descriptors for Mists of Akuma is intentional: eastern fantasy first, noir second, and steampunk third.

It’s an eastern world with dark overtones, and there happens to be steampunk in it, but it’s not an overwhelming presence. I’m a Warhammer 40k junkie, and I adore the relationship that universe has with technology and heresy, so here we’ve combined them. In Mists of Akuma, one of the major elements of the setting are tsukumogami, objects that transform into creatures on their 100th birthday. Because most technology is from afar or antiquated, it inspires fear because that rifle you’ve got might wake up and try to kill you!

Why add noir to the mix? And what do you mean by “noir”?

I’m an early graduate from the University of Pittsburgh with a major in Film Studies, so my go-to answer on what qualifies as noir comes from a seminal article on the subject by Paul Schrader in 1971: Notes on Film Noir. You can read the whole bit here, though this link is to the specific part I’m referencing).

The thing to understand about noir is that it was a genre of film borne from circumstance. If you check out Schrader’s article, you’ll find several different stylistic things that tie all films noir, no matter how disparate, to the genre—scenes largely lit for night, a Freudian fear of water, oblique lines in the mise-en-scène. Think about Westerns with their big, wide horizontal landscapes and compare that to films noir—lots of vertical blinds, disruptive vertical shadows, and the like. These are the results of budgetary restraints and production realities, but most of the directors behind these movies (notably Fritz Lang and Billy Wilder) had fled from the rise of Nazism and were masters of German Expressionism. The lack of lighting that creates the dark ambiance of a film noir has to do with energy limits; there are stories of lighting techs breaking down into tears because their producers came down on them so hard. These are all reflective of the US wartime economy and the stylistic choices forced on those movies.

Why is Mists of Akuma a noir setting? The world is predicated for you to lose against a constant battle to retain your virtue. I had a hankering for a dark setting, not something borne out of old school horror but of desperation. The antiheroic roles of noir protagonists was a perfect fit, doubly so because corruption is a major part of the world. It became clear that noir was a term that fits what we want GMs and players to expect when they sit down for a game in Soburin. Victories are few, Pyrrhic, and usually involve a great deal of sacrifice.

RPG adventures come in many forms, from location-based exploration to plot-driven investigations and other variations. What sorts of adventures work best in the Mists of Akuma setting?

City-based adventures have proven the best so far, but we’re building the setting in such a way that quests will be easy to come by. To fight the demon-spewing Mists of Akuma that roil over Soburin, the Masuto Imperial Family has decreed that each of the 23 clans have “bengoshi,” functionaries able to deputize people to help keep order. There’s an obvious love for investigations, and GMs will find the detailed entries we’re focusing on very useful for those purposes. Our first stretch goal is for the DM of my youth to write an adventure to be included in the book: Will of the Palemaster, a module that takes place in a fort during a festival when the Mists of Akuma suddenly appear!

Mists of AkumaPeople who already love Eastern Fantasy are probably already sold on Mists of Akuma, but how do you tempt those who’re used to “classic” (European) fantasy?

I’d point out that this is not a steampunk world—it is a world with steampunk in it—and that Eastern Fantasy is the first descriptor because that’s what the primary focus of Mists of Akuma is. You can still get a lot of excellent use out of the samurai sacred oath, tsukumogami hunter, imperial dragons, oni monsters, 23 distinctive clans, eastern weapons, martial arts stance feats, more than two dozen new race options, character backgrounds, and more. Those who check out the free preview PDFs will find that there’s no shortage of material they can mine for a more traditional game. It’s also not hard to imagine Soburin before foreign technology arrived, so removing the influence of technology altogether won’t be difficult.

What’s a list of 10 films/comics/novels/TV show that inspired Mists of Akuma?

Jeez man, did you do a background check on me! Auugh! I’m just going to list these straight off the top of my head because, frankly, there’re so many.

Afro Samurai

Samurai Champloo

Ravenloft

Warhammer 40k (all the fiction)

Sin City (both the comics and movies)

Eberron (from WotC)

Rokugan (and the original Oriental Adventures)

Jade Empire (on the old Xbox)

The Maltese Falcon (I’ve literally lost count of how many times I’ve watched this movie—prepare for many, many double-crosses), Gun Crazy, Double Indemnity, The Big Sleep, Detour, Kiss Me Deadly, Kill or be Killed, Ace in the Hole, White Heat (so sue me, there’s a lot of really good film noir)

Samurai Jack

Check out the Mists of Akuma Kickstarter.

One thought on “Creative Colleagues: Mike Myler

  1. Pingback: [Q&A] Mike Myler (Mists of Akuma) | The Hardboiled GMshoe's Office

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