Creative Colleagues: Dave Barrett

Every now and then, I pester my creative colleagues with five questions about their work. Most of these folks are friends, a few are secret enemies, and one has been blackmailing me for years.

Fun and GamesDave Barrett’s It’s All Fun and Games is the first in a series of Young Adult novels from the Nerdist’s new imprint through Inkshares. It features the teenage players of a Live Action Role Playing (LARP) game who find themselves transported to an actual, factual fantasy world. We’ve seen that trick before, but Barrett breathes new life into the conceit. I imagine hordes of young readers discovering LARPs the way so many of my generation got turned on to tabletop RPGs after reading the late Joel Rosenberg’s Guardians of the Flame novels.

I had the pleasure of reading an advance copy of Dave’s debut, and he kindly agreed to answer a few of my geeky questions.

Please tell us about your earliest experiences with tabletop RPGs and LARPs.

My older brother, Jim, brought home AD&D from high school in 1981. My first character was a ranger named Fred (I was 8). I remember playing White Plume Mountain and the Against the Giants series as solo adventures—it was just poor Fred. Considering the modules were made for full parties, my brother must have pulled a lot of punches to get me through them.

Later during elementary school, it was the Sword of Damocles hanging over my head for math tests. Anything less than a 90, and no D&D for the rest of the week. I did really well in Math that year.

I still try to play whenever I can. I’m mostly playing Pathfinder now.

My LARP experience is a different matter. It didn’t even occur to me it was possible until I got closer to college and learned about groups like NERO. The lack of internet made discovering these things really difficult! During college and just after I attended a couple events I had been invited to by friends and had a great time, though with busy life and young kids, it’s not always easy to find time for RPGs, particularly ones that stretch over full days. I’ve attended Intercon in Massachusetts, and had a lot of fun.

Chance in the form of dice rolls plays a big part in games. Wandering monsters, after all! How do you create a sense of randomness in a story without allowing it to feel like a cheat?

It’s funny you should ask, because I actually bring this up in It’s All Fun and Games. Playing D&D in the RPGA (and other orgs), I’ve gotten used to the idea of Obligatory Thug Attack, or OTA—a combat encounter designed mostly to sap the party of some of their resources so that when they fight the final boss they’re not at full strength. So I actually included that in the story—before the kids cross over into the game world they get jumped by some random monsters, and someone explains the OTA to Allison.

Once they cross over, though, that’s a different thing. If a scene isn’t advancing plot or character, or providing some sort of backstory, I personally don’t want to read about it. Because I wanted to write the kind of book I like to read, things move pretty directly toward the climax. I’m not writing a module, I’m writing a novel.

Why do you think interest in LARPs has grown so much in the past few decades?

I think this is a function of two things. First, mainstream culture has embraced geekdom wholeheartedly in the last several decades. Between the Lord of the Rings movies and the Marvel Cinematic Universe on the Big Screen, the huge successes of webseries like The Guild and LARPs, and of course The Big Bang Theory and World of Warcraft, it’s become OK to get dressed up as your favorite character and go to a convention. For instance, SDCC sells out of passes within minutes each year!

Second, it’s so much easier to find like-minded individuals nowadays. Growing up in Houston, I was able to find our local SCA folks (they were in the Yellow Pages!), but if anyone was LARPing down there, I didn’t know about it. Today, if you’re interested in giving it a try, it’s just a couple clicks away to find a group that’s playing the sort of game you want to get into.

How do you find playing RPGs complements your writing?

Playing RPGs expands your imagination, and without imagination, there’s no writing. I’ve played characters from sneaky rogues to flamboyant pirates to an elderly grandmother who could knit as well as she could cast the evil eye. Getting into a character and interacting with the others in your group—taking what they bring and building on it—is a great way to experience others’ personalities. Personalities that you could then turn into characters!

On the other side, the RPG view does run the risk of making your foils one-dimensional. Players think of elaborate backstories that brought their character to this point in time and spend hours roleplaying with one another. Then, in six rounds of combat they run ramshackle over the baddie and his henchmen, loot the bodies, and move on. Those baddies must have had just as complex reasons for doing what they did, but because they only exist as a speed bump in the overall campaign, we never really think much about that.

For a Young Adult book, where do you draw the line on violence? How about sexuality?

In a fantasy adventure novel, violence is almost a given, simply due to the nature of the genre. Some baddie is going to be defeated by the good guy, who will use swords or magic or both. I’ve used my own kids as my guide—what would I be comfortable for them to read? In most cases, my descriptions are enough to get the point across without being something that will give my kids nightmares. The reader will be creating their own images in their heads, and if someone is envisioning a bloodier battle, their minds can certainly go there with what I’ve provided

Sexuality, I just punted. It’s All Fun and Games isn’t a romance novel (or even a fantasy romance novel). I left myself a little wiggle room if I really wanted to head down that route with sequels, but I’m pretty sure it’s the last thing on their minds right now. Only one of the characters is even old enough to drive, so even if I decide to pair off any of the characters, it’s going to be pretty tame. If readers want a novel that explores teenage sexuality, there are plenty of choices on the market.

Check out It’s All Fun and Games at Inkshares (or on Amazon) and keep an eye on the latest news on Facebook. For your bonus action, follow Dave Barrett on Twitter.

 

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